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Title: Effects of recent logging on the main channel of North Fork Caspar Creek

Author: Lisle, Thomas E.; Napolitano, Michael.;

Date: 1998

Source: In: Ziemer, Robert R., technical coordinator. Proceedings of the conference on coastal watersheds: the Caspar Creek story, 6 May 1998; Ukiah, California. General Tech. Rep. PSW GTR-168. Albany, California: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture: 81-85

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: The response of the mainstem channel of North Fork Caspar Creek to recent logging is examined by time trends in bed load yield, scour and fill at resurveyed cross sections, and the volume and fine-sediment content of pools. Companion papers report that recent logging has increased streamflow during the summer and moderate winter rainfall events, and blowdowns from buffer strips have contributed more large woody debris. Changes in bed load yield were not detected despite a strong correlation between total scour and fill and annual effective discharge, perhaps because changes in stormflows were modest. The strongest responses are an increase in sediment storage and pool volume, particularly in the downstream portion of the channel along a buffer zone, where large woody debris (LWD) inputs are high. The association of high sediment storage and pool volume with large inputs of LWD is consistent with previous experiments in other watersheds. This suggests that improved habitat conditions after recent blowdowns will be followed in future decades by less favorable conditions as present LWD decays and input rates from depleted riparian sources in adjacent clearcuts and buffer zones decline.

Keywords: Caspar Creek, watershed, sediment, woody debris, logging, bed load yield, fine sediment, pools, streamflow

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Lisle, Thomas E.; Napolitano, Michael. 1998. Effects of recent logging on the main channel of North Fork Caspar Creek. In: Ziemer, Robert R., technical coordinator. Proceedings of the conference on coastal watersheds: the Caspar Creek story, 6 May 1998; Ukiah, California. General Tech. Rep. PSW GTR-168. Albany, California: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture: 81-85

 


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