Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (1.8 MB bytes)

Title: Exposure to an enriched CO2 atmosphere alters carbon assimilation and allocation in a pine forest ecosystem

Author: Schafer, Karina V.R.; Oren, Ram; Ellsworth, David S.; Lai, Chun-Ta; Herricks, Jeffrey D.; Finzi, Adrien C.; Richter, Daniel D.; Katul, Gabriel G.;

Date: 2003

Source: Global Change Biology (2003) 9, 1378-1400

Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication

Description: We linked a leaf-level C02 assimilation model with a model that accounts for light attenuation in the canopy and measurements of sap-flux-based canopy conductance into a new canopy conductance-constrained carbon assimilation (4C-A) model. We estimated canopy C02 uptake (AnC) at the Duke Forest free-air C02 enrichment (FACE) study. Rates of AnC estimated from the 4C-A model agreed well with leaf gas exchange measurements (Anet) in both CO2 treatments. Under ambient conditions, monthly sums of net C02 uptake by the canopy (AnC) were 13% higher than estimates based on eddy-covariance and chamber measurements. Annual estimates of AnC were only 3% higher than carbon (C) accumulations and losses estimated from ground-based measurements for the entire stand. The C budget for the Pinus taeda component was well constrained (within 1% of ground-based measurements). Although the closure of the C budget for the broadleaf species was poorer (within 20%), these species are a minor component of the forest. Under elevated C02, the C used annually for growth, turnover, and resptration balanced only 80% of the AnC Of the extra 700g Cm-2a-1 (1999 and 2000 average), 86% is attributable to surface soil CO2 efflux. This suggests that the production and turnover of fine roots was underestimated or that mnycorrhizae and rhizodeposition became an increasingly important component of the C balance. Under elevated CO2, net ecosystem production increased by 272g Cm-2a-1, 44% greater than under ambient CO2. The majority (87%) of this C was sequestered in a moderately long-term C pool in wood, with the remainder in the forest floor-soil subsystem.

Keywords: Canopy stomatal conductance, free air CO2 enrichment, net ecosystem exchange, net primary productivity, plant canopy modelling, respiration

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • You may send email to pubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication. (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)

XML: View XML

Citation:


Schafer, Karina V.R.; Oren, Ram; Ellsworth, David S.; Lai, Chun-Ta; Herricks, Jeffrey D.; Finzi, Adrien C.; Richter, Daniel D.; Katul, Gabriel G. 2003. Exposure to an enriched CO2 atmosphere alters carbon assimilation and allocation in a pine forest ecosystem. Global Change Biology (2003) 9, 1378-1400

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.